20 apr. 2012

The "Ovidiu Oana-parau" private bell collection

Astăzi am creat un nou album pe site-ul colecţiei de clopote, album intitulat "Monede cu clopote" [coin with bells]
Fiecate piesă poartă o reală încărcătură istorică, dincolo de valoarea comercială.
Se detaşează în mod special, clopoţelul celtic (sec. 5-4 B.C.), predecesorul banilor din epoca "proto-monney".


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Black Sea area. Circa 500-400 BC. Ancient Celtic bronze bell Proto Money.
Rare example of the wide variety of Celtic bronze Proto-Money, used as currency before the introduction of the coins in the Eastern Danube region and the Black sea area by the Eastern Celts.
Beautiful dark patina.
Length: 22 mm.
Origin: aquisition from Ancient Caesar House US - 2009

500-400 BC.

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Silver dollar commemorating The Bicenntenial of Independence.
One size is President Esenhower, the other one is The Independence bell.

Liberty bell was cast in 1752 (Recast 1753 by Pass and Stow) with the lettering (part of Leviticus 25:10) "Proclaim LIBERTY throughout all the land unto all the inhabitants thereof."

Bells were rung to mark the reading of the Declaration of Independence on July 8, 1776, and while there is no contemporary account of the Liberty Bell ringing, most historians believe it was one of the bells rung. After American independence was secured, it fell into relative obscurity for some years. In the 1830s, the bell was adopted as a symbol by abolitionist societies, who dubbed it the "Liberty Bell". It acquired its distinctive large crack sometime in the early 19th century—a widespread story claims it cracked while ringing after the death of Chief Justice John Marshall in 1835.


The bell became widely famous after an 1847 short story claimed that an aged bell-ringer rang it on July 4, 1776, upon hearing of the Second Continental Congress's vote for independence. While the bell could not have been rung on that Fourth of July, as no announcement of the Declaration was made that day, the tale was widely accepted as fact, even by some historians. Beginning in 1885, the City of Philadelphia, which owns the bell, allowed it to go to various expositions and patriotic gatherings. The bell attracted huge crowds wherever it went, additional cracking occurred and pieces were chipped away by souvenir hunters. The last such journey occurred in 1915, after which the city refused further requests.

After World War II, the city allowed the National Park Service to take custody of the bell, while retaining ownership. The bell was used as a symbol of freedom during the Cold War and was a popular site for protests in the 1960s. It was moved from its longtime home in Independence Hall to a nearby glass pavilion on Independence Mall in 1976, and then to the larger Liberty Bell Center adjacent to the pavilion in 2003. The bell has been featured on coins and stamps, and its name and image have been widely used by corporations.

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This is a New Orleans area Mardi Gras token from 1976.
On the reverse is written "Let Freedom Ring" 1776 - 1976.
It pictures the Liberty Bell with a map of the United States behind it.
The caption reads "JUNO Mardi Gras:New Orleans"

This coin is 1-1/2" in diameter and made from aluminum.

MARDI GRAS TOKEN HISTORY

New Orleans Mardi Gras tokens were first minted in 1960 when Rex, King of Mardi Gras, presented the first tokens to his loyal subjects, by throwing them from his parade floats. Many parade organizations, called krewes, soon picked up on this new concept. They placed their crest or emblem on the obverse, and the yearly theme of their parade on the reverse of the dated tokens.

H. Alvin Sharp, a very gifted inventor and artist, came up with the idea and designed many of them. He named these tokens, "doubloons". Those doubloons that are thrown to the crowds are made from lightweight 15 gauge aluminum with some of them anodized different colors. The "heavies", as they are called, are minted from thicker 10 gauge aluminum, bronze, .999 silver, and other metals. Most of these are handed out to relatives and friends as favors.

Truly a work of art, these silver-dollar sized tokens measure about 1-1/2” in diameter. Not only are they collected in the New Orleans area, but all around the country, and the world as well. They are highly desirable for rare dates, rare krewes, and for the collectible subject matter on the reverses.

They have never been sold to the general public by the organizations since they were only made for Mardi Gras throws and favors. They are minted in limited quantities each year, and many hundred's of thousands in collections were lost in the flood waters of Hurricane Katrina in 2005.

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This is a New Orleans area Mardi Gras token from 1976.
The caption reads, "Let Freedom Ring". It pictures the Liberty Bell with a map of the United States behind it.
On the reverse is written "JUNO Mardi Gras:New Orleans"

This coin is 1-1/2" in diameter and made from aluminum.

MARDI GRAS TOKEN HISTORY

New Orleans Mardi Gras tokens were first minted in 1960 when Rex, King of Mardi Gras, presented the first tokens to his loyal subjects, by throwing them from his parade floats. Many parade organizations, called krewes, soon picked up on this new concept. They placed their crest or emblem on the obverse, and the yearly theme of their parade on the reverse of the dated tokens.

H. Alvin Sharp, a very gifted inventor and artist, came up with the idea and designed many of them. He named these tokens, "doubloons". Those doubloons that are thrown to the crowds are made from lightweight 15 gauge aluminum with some of them anodized different colors. The "heavies", as they are called, are minted from thicker 10 gauge aluminum, bronze, .999 silver, and other metals. Most of these are handed out to relatives and friends as favors.

Truly a work of art, these silver-dollar sized tokens measure about 1-1/2” in diameter. Not only are they collected in the New Orleans area, but all around the country, and the world as well. They are highly desirable for rare dates, rare krewes, and for the collectible subject matter on the reverses.

They have never been sold to the general public by the organizations since they were only made for Mardi Gras throws and favors. They are minted in limited quantities each year, and many hundred's of thousands in collections were lost in the flood waters of Hurricane Katrina in 2005.



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An half silver dollar dated 1953
one size is Ben Franklin, the other one is Independence Bell

Liberty bell was cast in 1752 (Recast 1753 by Pass and Stow) with the lettering (part of Leviticus 25:10) "Proclaim LIBERTY throughout all the land unto all the inhabitants thereof."

Bells were rung to mark the reading of the Declaration of Independence on July 8, 1776, and while there is no contemporary account of the Liberty Bell ringing, most historians believe it was one of the bells rung. After American independence was secured, it fell into relative obscurity for some years. In the 1830s, the bell was adopted as a symbol by abolitionist societies, who dubbed it the "Liberty Bell". It acquired its distinctive large crack sometime in the early 19th century—a widespread story claims it cracked while ringing after the death of Chief Justice John Marshall in 1835.

The bell became widely famous after an 1847 short story claimed that an aged bell-ringer rang it on July 4, 1776, upon hearing of the Second Continental Congress's vote for independence. While the bell could not have been rung on that Fourth of July, as no announcement of the Declaration was made that day, the tale was widely accepted as fact, even by some historians. Beginning in 1885, the City of Philadelphia, which owns the bell, allowed it to go to various expositions and patriotic gatherings. The bell attracted huge crowds wherever it went, additional cracking occurred and pieces were chipped away by souvenir hunters. The last such journey occurred in 1915, after which the city refused further requests.

After World War II, the city allowed the National Park Service to take custody of the bell, while retaining ownership. The bell was used as a symbol of freedom during the Cold War and was a popular site for protests in the 1960s. It was moved from its longtime home in Independence Hall to a nearby glass pavilion on Independence Mall in 1976, and then to the larger Liberty Bell Center adjacent to the pavilion in 2003. The bell has been featured on coins and stamps, and its name and image have been widely used by corporations.

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LIBERTY BELL INDEPENDENCE HALL SILVER COIN 1753

Side 1 is LIBERTY BELL 1753
Reverse is INDEPENDENCE HALL 1861

Silver Commemorative COIN
Diameter :40 mm Weight: 1 Ounce
MATERIAL: .999 Fine Silver Plated FINISH

Liberty bell was cast in 1752 (Recast 1753 by Pass and Stow) with the lettering (part of Leviticus 25:10) "Proclaim LIBERTY throughout all the land unto all the inhabitants thereof."

Bells were rung to mark the reading of the Declaration of Independence on July 8, 1776, and while there is no contemporary account of the Liberty Bell ringing, most historians believe it was one of the bells rung. After American independence was secured, it fell into relative obscurity for some years. In the 1830s, the bell was adopted as a symbol by abolitionist societies, who dubbed it the "Liberty Bell". It acquired its distinctive large crack sometime in the early 19th century—a widespread story claims it cracked while ringing after the death of Chief Justice John Marshall in 1835.

The bell became widely famous after an 1847 short story claimed that an aged bell-ringer rang it on July 4, 1776, upon hearing of the Second Continental Congress's vote for independence. While the bell could not have been rung on that Fourth of July, as no announcement of the Declaration was made that day, the tale was widely accepted as fact, even by some historians. Beginning in 1885, the City of Philadelphia, which owns the bell, allowed it to go to various expositions and patriotic gatherings. The bell attracted huge crowds wherever it went, additional cracking occurred and pieces were chipped away by souvenir hunters. The last such journey occurred in 1915, after which the city refused further requests.

After World War II, the city allowed the National Park Service to take custody of the bell, while retaining ownership. The bell was used as a symbol of freedom during the Cold War and was a popular site for protests in the 1960s. It was moved from its longtime home in Independence Hall to a nearby glass pavilion on Independence Mall in 1976, and then to the larger Liberty Bell Center adjacent to the pavilion in 2003. The bell has been featured on coins and stamps, and its name and image have been widely used by corporations.

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The Isle of Man's symbol, the Triskelion, is depicted with three bells, which symbolise church bells, with an inscription stating, "Millennium Bells."
This is a £1 - One Pound Coin

The circulating British one pound (£1) coin is minted from a nickel-brass alloy of approximately 70% copper, 24.5% zinc, and 5.5% nickel. The coin weighs 9.50 grams (0.34 oz) and has a diameter of 22.50 millimetres (0.89 in.).[1] The value of the composition metals in a £1 coin amount to approximately 4.18 UK pennies or 6.44 US cents as of January 7, 2012. This is about a 24 times price per metal content.

The coin was introduced on 21 April 1983 to replace the Bank of England one pound note, which ceased to be issued at the end of 1984 and was removed from circulation (though still redeemable at the Bank's offices) on 11 March 1988. One pound notes are still issued in Jersey, Guernsey and the Isle of Man, and by the Royal Bank of Scotland, but the pound coin is much more widely used. It was given the nickname "round pound" on introduction, although this term did not remain in common use.

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